The New York Athletic Commission has codified rules for when instant replay should be used in MMA.

The New York Athletic Commission has formalized rules for using instant replay leading up to the next huge UFC event at Madison Square Garden on November 4th.

The commission found itself under fire following an incident at UFC 210 where Gegard Mousasi defeated Chris Weidman via some controversial knees. Referee Dan Miragliotta originally ruled them illegal as Weidman’s hands seemed to be touching the canvas. But after consulting with officials outside the ring who had watched replays, the strikes were deemed legal and Mousasi declared the winner. Weidman appealed the loss, noting that New York had nothing on the books allowing instant replay.

Now they do. Via Newsday:

Under NYSAC policy now, the in-ring referee is permitted to view the sequence that ended a fight to determine the correct outcome. Such a review only can occur in the time between the fight being stopped and the final decision being announced. The in-ring referee may consult with the alternate referee, but authorization to make the final call rests solely with the in-ring referee.

No fight can resume after the instant replay review.

Here’s the full instant replay policy:

NYSAC instant replay policy for MMA

1. When adequate technology is available, instant replay may be used by the in-ring referee to examine the fight ending sequence to determine the correct outcome of a bout

2. Instant replay may be used after the fight has officially concluded and before the final official outcome of the fight is announced in the ring.

3. Only the in-ring referee is authorized to initiate instant replay review.

4. The in-ring referee him/herself must watch the instant replay footage of the fight ending sequence on a video monitor provided for such purpose.

5. The in-ring referee may consult with the alternate referee to determine the correct outcome of a bout.

6. Only the in-ring referee is authorized to make the final official in-ring determination of the outcome of the bout following the instant replay review.

7. The fight cannot be resumed after the instant replay review.

8. Nothing in this policy shall restrict the Commission’s authority to review video evidence to determine the correct outcome after the final official outcome of a bout has been announced in the ring.

Now we’ll just have to see if the commission officials end up using these new powers properly. It’s been a rocky road for events held in New York over the past year. It’d be nice to think this new rule will help, but strange things continue to happen in the state that never quite seem to go by the book.