Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) bantamweight champion Cody Garbrandt recently dished some dirt on former training partner and upcoming opponent, T.J. Dillashaw, revealing that “Viper” wasn’t exactly the ideal training partner, as he was known for purposely hurting his teammates during sessions.

Naturally, Dillashaw was quick to dismiss the claims, saying that while he may be an aggressive training partner, he would never intentionally hurt his teammates, and says he did not concuss Chris Holdsworth with a knee to his head.

Now, Chris is giving his side of the story, saying T.J. did in fact knee him in the top of the head when there was no need to do so.

“I’ve been quiet about this for a while,” Holdsworth said. “I’m just not the type of person to jump into people’s feuds or drama. I like to lay low and just do my thing, but there’s been some talk, and after I heard T.J. lying about the subject, I’ve got to speak up on it,” he said on The MMA Hour )via MMA Fighting).

“T.J. has always been a great fighter, he’s a great athlete, but he’s always had, I don’t know, some type of competitive feud with me ever since I came to the team,” said Holdsworth. “I don’t know if it was because of envy or jealousy or whatever it was, but I just kinda always brushed it off as him being competitive and being, just, ultra-aggressive. I was always up for the fight, but there was multiple occasions where T.J. got a little bit too aggressive, he went overboard in training. He’s kneeing you while we’re boxing. He’s throwing elbows while we’re doing jiu-jitsu. And I remember that instance that’s out in the public — yeah, it’s definitely true.”

Regarding the specific incident in which Dillashaw gave him a concussion due to a cheap blow, Holdsworth — who is now a coach at TAM — gave his take on how it all went down.

“I shot in on T.J. and I was on all fours, he was sprawled out and he kneed me on top of the head. And that was before The Ultimate Fighter. I remember I was kinda jarred up and everyone was watching, and I took like 30 seconds off and I kept going, I kept going through the rounds and I finished practice. But after that practice, I was concussed, and that was my first concussion. And it just kinda kept happening from there,” he said.

Holdsworth went on to win TUF 18, but hasn’t competed in MMA since his win over Chico Camus 2014 due to concussion-related issues, which Garbrandt says are due to Dillashaw’s dirty tactics.

Furthermore, he corroborated Urijah Faber’s claims that Dillashaw wasn’t exactly always on the up-and-up when it came to banned substances.

“There was another instance leading up to the Chico (Camus) fight (in 2014), when he was getting ready for (Renan) Barao,” Holdsworth added. “And then it comes to where I hear he’s on some special supplements and stuff, and I just lost respect for the guy. There’s no hard feelings, it’s whatever it is, but he’s a cheater.”

According to Holdsworth, Dillashaw was always good person outside of the cage, but once the cage doors shut behind him, he was a different person.

“[Dillashaw] is the type of guy who was cool off the mat, but he’d try to hurt you or injure you on the mat. He wasn’t ever really a good training partner. We went hard. We probably got better going with each other, but it’s not good. It’s not good to have that many wars. You’re supposed to be helping each other,” he added.

“I heard some other interview where he was saying [my concussion problems were] from me being malnourished, and I didn’t know how to cut weight and stuff, which is false. So I’m not trying to harp and just fucking throw him under the bus, but I’m telling the truth and I have no reason to lie. You guys can take it how you want to take it, and it’s going to be a great fight Saturday night.”

Not a good look for T.J., who will face Garbrandt in the co-main event of this weekend’s UFC 217 pay-per-view (PPV) event in New York City.