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Keith Kizer Explains Jon Jones’ DQ Loss, Jones Moving On

No competitor enjoys losing, and it’s even tougher swallow when you’re undefeated. Although his controversial disqualification loss to Matt Hamill at The Ultimate Fighter 10 Finale this weekend is the only blemish on his professional career, Jon Jones has already come to terms with the loss and is ready to move on.

“I’m not worried about that,” Jones said about his 9-1 record. “Hopefully, my manager can take care of all that stuff. Definitely took a lot of pride in being undefeated, and so proud of being a martial artist, strive so hard to be the best that I can be. Everything happens for a reason.”

Jones was dominating Hamill for most of the first round, even landing double-digit shots that went unanswered. Although the assault wasn’t lethal, Jones felt it may have warranted referee Steve Mazzagatti to step in and stop the fight as he reconstructed Hamill’s grill.

“I think at 14, 15 unanswered punches, it should be stopped,” Jones said of the barrage. “I said it so many interviews that I respect Hamill a lot for the inspiration that he is, and it was awkward to just keep hitting him like that. I was like let’s stop this, but what are you going to do?

“I hit him so many times, and I just wasn’t understanding why it wasn’t getting stopped. Is he waiting for me to gas or something? I was like what is this? I looked at him twice, I was like ‘why am I still hitting this guy?’”

However, it wasn’t stopped, which this pundit agreed with, and Jones went on to land an illegal, north-south elbow to Hamill’s grill, a definite no-no, but news-new to Jones-Jones.

Because he wasn’t fully aware of the rules, he threw the blows intending to inflict nasty damage, thus the “intentional” illegal strike ruling from the referee.

“This was actually the first time instant replay was used in Nevada, looked at it, obviously a lot of damage was done by legal blows, but there was also damage done by the illegal elbows, and obviously as you know if there’s any contributory effect of the illegal blows, disqualification’s the call,” Nevada State Athletic Commission Executive Director Keith Kizer told

To clarify why the bout wasn’t ruled a No Contest as opposed to a loss for Jones, Kizer explained the only time a No Contest would be ruled is if the blows that brought an end of the fight were accidental. Because the elbows were intentional, Jones was handed the DQ.

If one were to lose a fight, this would be the way to lose it, and the 22-year-old appears to have understood that. His stock certainly hasn’t gone down… if anything it went up as he was thoroughly tossing Hamill around the Octagon before his bows.

“I feel great. I’m healthy. I have no injuries,” Jones said. “I get to go home and see my daughter and my girlfriend. I haven’t seen them in so long. I don’t really care about the loss. I’m at peace.”